Realrides Of WNY

RealRides of WNY - 1991 Olds Cutlass Cruiser SL

This 1991 Olds Cutlass Cruiser SL wagon is owned (and driven regularly) by RealRides reader Frank Coloprisco of Amherst, and it’s equipped with the optional 3.1L V6 and rear-facing third-row seat. These things were normally-sized (as opposed to an SUV or a minivan), yet still held eight passengers, and with the seats folded down could carry almost 75 cu. ft. of cargo. This car is pretty rare

RealRides of WNY - 1960 Ford Starliner

Nothing says 1960s opulence like a rear continental kit attached by a bumper extension long enough to eat dinner off of. That’s how it was back when this 1960 Ford Starliner was new. This one, seen at last summer’s Olcott Beach Car Show, also has chrome fender skirts, dual chrome exhaust tips, twin rear fender-mounted radio antennae, and twin rear-view mirror/spotlight combos. Oh, and

RealRides of WNY - 1963 Ford Thunderbird

Thanks to RealRides’ spotter Steve Chichon, who sent along this photo after spotting a 1963 Ford Thunderbird Landau while motoring through Snyder a couple of weeks ago. The Landau was new for 1963, distinguished from the regular hardtop by its padded vinyl roof and chrome landau “S” bar on the C-pillars — both of which Ford tells us, lent “…traditional elegance

RealRides of WNY - 1988 Toyota Supra

Saw this 1988 Toyota Supra over the weekend while bicycling around Tonawanda, probably the first one I’ve ever seen with a trailer hitch! When the Supra was introduced in 1978, it was pretty much a Celica, stretched to accommodate an inline six-cylinder engine (Celicas were all fours). In fact, they were sold as the Celica Supra until mid-1986 when, after a total makeover, the Celica moniker

RealRides of WNY - 1973 Continental Mark IV

The rims on this 1973 Continental Mark IV look a lot like American Racing wheels, but the blank center cap leaves me wondering. One thing for sure, the tires are Vogues, and I think this is a great combination on this car. The ‘73s had the federally-mandated large front bumper, but still wore a relatively normal-sized one out back. On the dash of the Mark IV’s sumptuous interiors was a

RealRides of WNY - 1959 Cadillac

This 1959 Cadillac Sixty-Two is owned by RealRides reader Anthony Frandina of Derby. (The photo at the right was taken at last summer's WNY Cadillac & LaSalle Club's show at Keyser Cadillac in Williamsville.) If there was such a thing an as entry-level Cadillac in 1959, it was the series Sixty-Two, which was available as a two-door hardtop, convertible, and two different four-door hardtops: a

RealRides of WNY - 1950 Ford

Now this takes me back… It’s a 1950 Ford, odds are a Business Coupe or a Club Coupe — but it’s hard to say what with that crazy chopped top! This car reminds me of the model cars we used to build back in the day (although I never mastered the chopping of tops): fender skirts, side pipes, rolled pans, custom grille, no bumpers... lots of work went into this one. And I love

RealRides of WNY - 1963 Corvair Monza

This 1963 Corvair Monza marked the penultimate year for the first-generation rear-engined Chevrolet compact. The convertible was one of three body styles still offered for 1963, the other two being the four-door sedan and the club coupe. There was also the Corvair Greenbrier Sports Wagon, which was really a van and probably in the Corvair lineup only due to its rear-mounted engine. This white conv

RealRides of WNY - Buick Riviera, c. 1984

Yes, this is a factory-built Buick Riviera convertible, c. 1984, seen a couple of summers ago in North Tonawanda. Back in the 1980s there was more than one company out there making after-market convertibles out of factory two-door coupes, seeing that most of Detroit stopped making drop-tops in the mid-1970s after the tightening of auto safety regulations. Eventually, technology caught up enough fo

RealRides of WNY - 1957 Chrysler Windsor

You might not think so to look at it, but this 1957 Chrysler Windsor four-door sedan was the least expensive Chrysler model you could buy that year. Of course, this one’s been fancied-up a bit with two-tone paint, fender skirts, quad headlights, curb feelers (!), and other goodies, but its curb appeal puts many of today’s high-end sedans (which is was Chryslers were back then) to shame