Realrides Of WNY

RealRides of WNY - 1969 Buick Wildcat

By the time this 1969 Buick Wildcathit the showrooms, the nameplate had undergone quite a change. Introduced in 1962 as a sub-series of the Invicta, it was poised to do battle with the likes of Pontiac’s new Grand Prix in the new personal luxury coupe genre. Where the Grand Prix really took off, the Wildcat went down a different path, branching out to a full lineup of two- and four-door hard

RealRides of WNY - 1969 Rambler Rogue

This 1969 Rambler Roguewas the last car to wear the Rambler nameplate. Also for 1969 it was the first (and last) year that this model wouldn’t be called Rambler American, as the American moniker was dropped, and the three models offered were Rambler (basic model, offered as a 2-door sedan only), Rambler 440 (4-door sedan and station wagon), and Rambler Rogue (2-door hardtop). All of American

RealRides of WNY - 1966 Ford Galaxie 500

Hard to look at this 1966 Ford Galaxie 500and not think family car. Nothing fancy — although it wasn’t the cheapest big Ford sedan that year, as the Custom and Custom 500 models were a bit more plain. Ford, in its Buyer’s Digest of New Car Facts for 1966, told us that Families like its roominess and convenience, the luxuriously solid, smooth and quiet ride, the economy and total

RealRides of WNY - 1965 Chevrolet Impala SS

We’re guessing here that this 1965 Chevy Impala SSis wearing a Mist Blue paint job — another one of those hues not seen on today’s new cars. Chevy offered 15 solid colors on its full-sized 1965 cars, along with nine two-tone combinations. Check out the chart below, and you’ll see three blues, two greens, and two turquoises, along with black, white, maroon, orchid (!), red,

RealRides of WNY - 1974 Olds Delta 88

While researching this 1974 Oldsmobile Delta 88 Royale, I looked high and low for info on the Limited Editionfender badge. Old Olds brochures, Google searches— even Wikipedia offered no help. Then I had an epiphany. A quick trip to one of the national auto parts web pages yielded the results you see below. Kind of reminds me of the Turbobadge I affixed to the tailgate of my ’95 Buick C

RealRides of WNY - AMC Matador, c1975

In the mid-1970s it seemed that every manufacturer had an entry in the personal luxury field — a mid-sized two-door with most of the niceties of a higher-end luxury car. American Motors chimed-in in 1974 with a redesigned, and curiously-named, Matador coupe. I say curiously-namedbecause visually it had absolutely nothing in common with the Matador four-door sedan and station wagon. Its looks

RealRides of WNY (on the Road) - Mitsubishi Mighty Max

This Mitsubishi Mighty Maxpickup, seen last month while we vay-cayed in Seattle, looks like someone was performing a brake test behind a bus… and failed. The Mighty Max was a compact pickup (what ever happened to thatidea, anyway?) produced by Mitsu for about ten years starting in 1986. A badge-engineered version was sold in US Dodge dealers as the Ram 50 (below),which for a while gave Dodg

RealRides of WNY (on the Road) - Mustang Mach 1, c1971

Not every FordMustang Mach 1still on the road is here in North America. This one, circa 1971-72, was sent in by former WNYer Tad Dziekonski during an extended stint in Bogotá, Columbia. Tad’s found quite a few old cars still in service down there, from family cars to old SUVs. The Mach 1 was advertised by Ford as “…ready to move you over roads near and far in Mach-nificen

RealRides of WNY - 1962 Buick Special

When the American compact car market dawned in 1959, neither Rambler nor Studebaker offered a convertible model of their American or Lark. A Lark drop-top appeared for MY 1960, just as the Big Three were introducing the Ford Falcon, Chevy Corvair, and Chrysler Corporation’s Valiant (it wasn’t yet a Plymouth, officially). No convertibles from any of them. General Motors’ other div

RealRides of WNY - 1957 Rambler Custom

The 1957 Rambler Custom, like this one seen this past summer at the Buffalo History Museum’s nnual classic car event, was available with either a six-cylinder or V-8 engine. The six, which AMC called “…the thriftiest power plant on the American scene,”was a 195.6 cu. in. unit, putting out 125 hp (or 135 hp with the optional power pack), while the 190-hp V-8 checked in at 2