Realrides Of WNY

RealRides of WNY

It’s always convertible weather somewhere. Just not right here right now — unless of course you keep the top up and the heater on high. Saw this 1969 MG one day last week in Niagara Falls, sunny enough for top-down driving, but certainly not warm enough. These were the last of the good-looking MGs, that is, before our federal government starting mandating those terrible-looking five-mph bumpers, w

RealRides of WNY

“Where to, guvna?” If you were in Kenmore last week, you might have been tempted to hail this 1974 Austin FX4 London cab. It sure looks ready to go, sitting right out at the curb and all. It does though, have a for sale sign in the window, with an asking price of $4,500 OBO. Maybe some newly-minted Uber driver might snatch it up. And ditch his old Ford Tempo, Lol. Jim Corbran, RRofWNY …and check o

RealRides Of WNY

When the B-52s sang about buying a Chrysler “as big as a whale,” this is the one I always pictured in my mind. This particular 1947 Chrysler Club Coupe was seen over the summer in Depew. I would imagine after owning one of these for a few years, and wrangling that huge steering wheel while trying to coax the big coupe into its parking spot every day, you’d also have biceps as big as a whale. (If w

RealRides Of WNY

This 1994 Oldsmobile Bravada is a prime example of the problems General Motors was having late in the 20th century. They were simply selling too many versions of the same vehicles. This Bravada was not much more than a Chevy Blazer/GMC Jimmy with different (that is — cheap-looking plastic) trim. I imagine GM was merely stealing sales from itself for decades. This one has been parked in the same Ni

RealRides Of WNY

This mid-engined, plastic-bodied 1986 Pontiac Fiero GT, seen outside of a Niagara Falls Ford dealer, is from the nameplate’s second generation of style. The first gen, you may remember, somewhat resembled a door stop with its extreme wedge shape. I always thought this fastback version was much more balanced looking, but it came too late to save the Fiero from being dropped after the 1988 model yea

RealRides Of WNY

From GM’s Collanade styling era comes this 1977 Chevrolet El Camino. The styling (so-named for its pillared roofs and frameless door glass) was getting a little tired by ’77, the fifth year for the collonades. Someone decided that everything had to have rectangular headlights, whether they looked good or not! This red example was seen recently in Wheatfield, and you could buy it as is, or without

RealRides Of WNY

Wow, this 1966 Chevy Chevelle Super Sport 396 is really blue! And yes, Super Sport 396 is the proper name for the ’66 model; in 1967 they shortened it to the name everyone was using anyway, SS 396. The Super Sport 396 was loaded with many extras in the performance and handling department. From the brochure: “Anti-dive and anti-squat are built right in. The steering is Ball-Race.” Well then… okay.

RealRides Of WNY

This 1979 Dodge Aspen R/T is remarkable for a couple of reasons: its plastic add-on bits seem to still be intact (spoiler, window louvers), along with the factory striping. (The grille, however…) But also because its doesn’t appear to be the rustbucket that many Aspens (and their cousin Plymouth Volares) turned into — some not long after leaving the factory. This one was parked in Buffalo’s Rivers

RealRides Of WNY

This 1935 Ford Model 51 truck can be seen regularly in the parking lot of Goodman’s Farm Market in Niagara Falls. It’s wearing a Farm license plate, which means (among other things) that it can be used to transport farm goods from the farm to points of sale, or for transportation of laborers. This one I’m assuming gets used occasionally for something, because it’s not always parked in the same spo

RealRides Of WNY

Another four-door sedan from the Sixties — this one’s a 1966 Mercury Monterey Breezeway, so called because that rear-slanted back window slid sown to provide ventilation. A good idea comfort-wise, but the rear slant was necessary to keep rain out, and pretty much dictated the shape of the roofline. A regular-roofed four-door was also available without the opening window. The Breezeway was availabl