Realrides Of WNY

RealRides Of WNY

The last of its two-seaters (well, the body style would appear again in 2002 and last another four years): a 1957 Ford Thunderbird. This one has the porthole-windowed hardtop in place as it sits in a Niagara Falls parking lot, keeping company with a customized circa 1948 Ford coupe. Look closely at the two. The ’48 was a full-sized car when new, while the T-Bird was supposed to be a sports car. Ju

RealRides Of WNY

A 1964 Checker Marathon… and it’s not yellow! Yes, you could buy these things to use as your everyday car; they weren’t available only to taxi companies. This one does kind of look like a former cab though, what with the checkerboard stripe and the luggage rack on the roof. If you’ve ever been in one you probably remember them as being just about the roomiest sedans on the market — they probably s

RealRides Of WNY

I’m still scratching my head figuring out why this body style is no longer offered in the USA. Other countries across the ocean are able to buy vehicles much like this 1979 Ford Ranchero GT, which is nothing more than a sedan/station wagon fitted with a small pickup-style bed in place of the rear seat/cargo/trunk area. Ford got the ball rolling on these in the modern era back during the 1957 model

RealRides Of WNY

Back when this 1970 Chevrolet Caprice was new, you couldn’t drive more than a block without seeing a full-sized Chevy in someone’s driveway. The Caprice sat on the top rung of the big Chevy ladder back in 1970, just above the venerable Impala. It was GM’s answer to the Ford LTD, which offered luxury car features at popular car prices. This may be what eventually did in the Pontiac and Oldsmobile (

RealRides Of WNY

Wow, this 1963 Buick Riviera is sitting atop some really green grass, especially seeing that the photo was taken only two weeks ago, and we are after all in WNY in December! The first generation Rivs are thought by many to be one of the best-looking cars to ever come out of Detroit. This one’s for sale — it sure looks good from here, but the windshield lettering may provide a clue as to its mechan

RealRides Of WNY

If this 1967 Sunbeam Alpine looks vaguely familiar to you, perhaps it’s because you saw it at one or more events around town over the summer. The license plate (translation: Forgotten Buffalo) may give you a clue as to its ownership. This one has the rarely-seen hardtop in place, which might… might, I say, make it useable as a winter driver. Lol. This photo was taken over the summer at Artvoice’s

RealRides Of WNY

There may be a few bits missing (that we can see) on this 1967 Saab 96, but otherwise it looks very restorable. These things were pretty indestructible back in the day, and were winners of many international road rallies (the front-wheel-drive certainly didn’t hurt, nor did their nimble size). Looks weren’t high on the list when these Saabs were being designed, but no one seemed to care much. The

RealRides Of WNY

By the time this 1972 Oldsmobile Cutlass hit the showrooms, the nameplate was well on its way to becoming one of America’s best-selling cars. This one, seen last summer in Tonawanda, has the fastback coupe roofline. There was also a more formal-looking Cutlass Supreme two-door with a squared-off top. Jim Corbran, RRofWNY …and check out our Facebook page: Non-American Classic Cars The post RealRide

RealRides Of WNY

Every once in a while I come across this 1962 Mercury Comet. Glad to see it again a few weeks ago in Wheatfield. The Comet, as you may already know, was originally designed as an addition to the Edsel nameplate, but Edsel was in line to bite the dust at least a year before the Comet even hit the market, so Ford decided to put it in Mercury showrooms, where it did very well. Probably wouldn’t have

RealRides Of WNY

This 1979 Plymouth Horizon is remarkable in that, a) it’s still around at all and, b) it seems to have the premium wheel covers and the roof rack package which you almost never saw even when these things were new. The Horizon (and its twin the Dodge Omni) were Chrysler’s first North American-built front-wheel-drive cars, and from a block away could have easily been mistaken for a VW Rabbit. Which