Realrides Of WNY

RealRides of WNY - 1971 LeMans Sport

The 1971 Pontiac LeMans Sportwas available with a total of six different engines. Six! They ranged from the 250cid straight six (which was actually a Chevy engine), through five V8s: a 350cid, and two each of 400 and 455 cubic inches. There were also six transmission choices, depending on engine selection. About the LeMans Sport Pontiac said “Except for our own GTO, we can’t think of a

RealRides of WNY (on the road) - 1963 Dart GT

You’ve gotta love the copywriters for the 1963 Dodge Dart GT: “And for those drivers who tend to feel their way into a parking space, lookee here. There’s no excuse for it. In Dart, you can see all four fenders. Of course, if you insist on using the touch system, you’re in good shape. Dart bumpers can take it… and then some.”Doesn’t look like the drivers

RealRides of WNY - 1978 Electra 225

There are several ways to announce to the world that you’re now building smaller big cars. An ad for the 1978 Buick Electra 225, like this one which we saw last week in a Tonawandaparking lot, asked readers to“Consider… the fact that this full-size luxury car sits on a wheelbase occupied by some mid-size cars of only a few years ago. Thus making it lithe and nimble.”You&rs

RealRides of WNY - 1961 Mercury Econoline

Last week we featured an early Dodge van, and yesterday in this space was a Corvair Greenbrier from 1962. So it seems only fitting to follow up with one of these old compact trucks from the other member of The Big Three. But this one’s probably the rarest of them all — a 1961 Mercury Econolinepickup. That’s right — Mercury. Why, you may ask, was there such a thing? Well, it

RealRides of WNY - 1962 Greenbrier

The brochure refers to it as a 1962 Chevrolet Corvair Greenbrier Sports Wagon, but you’d be hard-pressed to find the Corvair nameplate anywhere on this compact van. We ran into Niagara Falls resident Pat Pilon a couple of times in the past two weeks with this, his newest purchase, a native-Pennsylvania van which was hauled out of an old barn in Livonia, N.Y.this past May (see photo) and brou

RealRides of WNY - Imperial, c1975

This Chrysler Imperial, c1975, was seen a while back in a Dunkirkdriveway. It’s wearing a dealer badge from Cunningham Chrysler-Plymouth, which is still doing business selling the complete Mopar lineup in Edinboro, Pennsylvania. The ’75 models were the last Imperials for a while, as slow sales convinced Chrysler that the Imperial’s time had maybe come and gone. The Imperial&rsquo

RealRides of WNY - 1982 Dodge 400

Chrysler is often credited with starting the comeback of the American convertible with the introduction of its 1982 LeBaron. What seems to often get lost in the shuffle is the fact that there was a corporate twin to the LeBaron, the 1982 Dodge 400. In their advertising, Dodge called it “America’s Most Beautiful Driving Machine…”Hyperboles aside, the 400 droptop wasa handso

RealRides of WNY - 1962 Ninety-Eight

Unlike in subsequent years, except for badges, trim bits (and an extra pair of taillight lenses), from the outside this 1962 Oldsmobile Ninety-Eightdidn’t look all that different from the less expensive 88-series cars. Yes, at 126 inches its wheelbase had an extra three inches, and the car itself was half-a-foot longer, but unless they noticed the six-window styling, from a block away your n

RealRides of WNY - 1957 Bel Air

As it says on the trunklid, this 1957 Chevy Bel Airis “Somethin’ Else.” Seen last Thursday at one of Akron’sweekly cruise nights, this one’s been given the works: new grille, huge cruiser skirts, wide whites with a set of killer hubcaps, pinstriping, and a beautiful green and black interior to offset the gorgeous paintjob. We’ll have to guess what’s under

RealRides of WNY - 1960 Mercedes-Benz 180

Judging from the AAA’s California State Automobile Association sticker on the trunk lid of this 1960 Mercedes-Benz 180(and the car’s pristine-looking condition), I’m going to go out on a limb here and guess that it hasn’t spent its entirelife here in WNY. These cars, produced from 1953-62, were often called Pontons, the German word for pontoon, a reference to their overall