Realrides Of WNY

RealRides Of WNY

(Finishing up Import Week…) Can’t spotlight foreign cars without featuring at least one British two-seat roadster/convertible. And why not go with one of the most popular of its day: a 1967 Triumph Spitfire Mk 3, seen some time ago in North Tonawanda. The Mk 3 was sold from model years 1967-70 — you can tell this one is a ’67 by its lack of side-maker lights, which were required beginning in 1968.

RealRides Of WNY

(Import Week continues…) The five-grand price tag on the windshield of this 1984 Mercedes-Benz 500SL AMG probably had more than a few passers-by drooling last summer when we snapped this photo in Tonawanda. I almost bought a reasonably-priced Benz back in the seventies, until the reality of the cost of M-B ownership sunk in before I pulled the trigger. Still, to this day I always wonder what-if… J

RealRides Of WNY

(Day Three of Import week…) This one is from the Not Aging Gracefully file, a 1974 Mercury Capri. Sold in Europe as a Ford, the Capri was a quick fix to give its Lincoln-Mercury dealers an entry in the import market, as well as temporarily appeasing them for their lack of an entry in the ponycar segment (with the Cougar having outgrown this category around the turn of the decade). Like most mid-19

RealRides Of WNY

(As we continue on into Import Week…) Nothing says class like a large British saloon. Especially when it’s a 1965 Jaguar Mark Ten 4.2 like this one, seen a while back in Youngstown. Real wood, real leather, and a real inline six-cylinder E-Type Jaguar motor under the bonnet. Nice. Of course, the word large is relative; in Blighty it was a huge car, but here in North America — not so much, especial

RealRides Of WNY

(Join us as we kick off import week) You knew that imports had turned a BIG corner back in 1972 when my motorhead friend Ronnie traded his 1968 Buick Skylark GS350 for a spanking new Datsun 240Z. A furrin’ car? With an inline six under the hood? Horrors! But Ronnie was on to something — one of the most affordable and fun-to-drive cars available in America. This 1987 Nissan 300ZX is from the third

RealRides Of WNY

I love seeing cars like this at car shows; they’re usually one-of-a-kind these days. How many Chevy Citations do supposed were saved from the wrecker’s ball? Chevy built their X-platform compact from model years 1980-85, as a successor to the Nova. Six years does not a long run make in the car world. The Citation (and its Buick, Olds, and Pontiac cousins) seemed like a good idea, but a poor reputa

RealRides Of WNY

Getting harder to find cars older than I am, but this 1931 Chevrolet sedan certainly fills the bill. And just what did $635 (f.o.b. Flint, Michigan) get you in 1931? For starters, according to the brochure: “Rear compartment richly carpeted, and equipped with foot rest and robe rail. Front seat adjustable. Upholstery of mohair or broadcloth…” This was one of seven different body styles available,

RealRides Of WNY

Look closely, and you’ll notice this might not be what you thought it was. It’s a 1962 Pontiac Parisienne, which was Pontiac’s top-of-the-line north of the border. Full-sized Canadian Pontiacs were built on the shorter Chevrolet chassis and used Chevy running gear. The Parisienne was (sort of) equivalent to the U.S. Bonneville trimwise. I found this one last summer at a car show on Queen Street in

RealRides Of WNY

Doing a little house cleaning over the weekend, my wife came upon what we thought was an empty coffee mug box. Opening it, we discovered about a half-dozen 1/64 scale toy cars, including this International Harvester Metro delivery van. This qualifies as a RealRide subject for the simple matter that, well, if I had some sort of business where I needed a truck, I’d somehow resurrect one of these, pa

RealRides Of WNY

My day is made when I happen upon something as rare as this 1980 Volvo 262C Bertone coupe (only 6,662 sold world-wide!). It’s basically a 262GL sedan with a new roof stamping, designed and installed by the Italian custom coachbuilder Bertone. The roof was not only more squared-off and formal-looking than Volvo’s regular 262GL two-door sedan, it was also three inches lower, necessitating a design c