Realrides Of WNY

RealRides of WNY

Trying to jazz-up a rather boxy-looking lineup, the 1978 Fairmont Futura made a grand entrance halfway through the introductory model year. They pretty much ended up with a boxy-looking Fairmont sporting a Thunderbird-style roof and rear deck. Which, I guess, is what they were going for. Saw this one some time ago in Sanborn. Jim Corbran, RRofWNY …and check out our Facebook page: Non-American Clas

RealRides of WNY

RealRides of WNY — Northern Texas edition. There is a WNY connection however. A few years ago I was at the CTC Auto Ranch in Denton, just outside of Dallas-Ft. Worth, with my daughter Katie as we headed home from Fort Hood. So many classics waiting to be saved — like this 1951 Chevrolet Fleetline Deluxe. Many of the pix we took are frame-worthy; maybe I should open a gallery! Jim Corbran, RRofWNY

RealRides of WNY

In the U.S. these were big cars, so you can just imagine how they compared to the VW Polos and Smart ForTwos in the Augustiner am Gendarmenmarkt beer garden parking lot in Berlin. If you’re going on a long driving trip, this 1983 Mercedes-Benz 300 SD Turbo Diesel could be your best ride ever. Stylish, comfortable, and powerful, it would make the miles effortlessly melt away! Saw this one recently

RealRides of WNY

It’s not often you see a 53-year-old classic still on the road in January in WNY, but it was just last week that I came across this 1963 Corvair Monza in a Tonawanda parking lot. These were some of the prettiest little cars of the 1960s; it’s too bad one man was able to drive the whole nameplate off a cliff. Jim Corbran, RRofWNY …and check out our Facebook page: Non-American Classic Cars The post

RealRides of WNY

I’m amazed at how many 1996 Geo Metros these days seem to be sporting K-Mart wheel covers (if they have any at all). I’m doubly amazed at how many Geo Metros I still see on the road period, as they’re not exactly collector cars, and were often regarded as throw-aways back in the day. We had a ’96 which we bough new, but it was the much more upscale LSi model with body-colored bumpers and a four-cy

RealRides of WNY

Of course this 1972 Chevy Corvette was not photographed recently — who’d be crazy enough to drive one of these in a WNY January? The ‘72s were lucky stylewise, as they just beat the federally-mandated bumper-car bumper regulations which would go into effect the following year, fully taking hold in 1974 as many new cars featured battering rams fore and aft. The ‘Vette made out better than most, but

RealRides of WNY

There’s something charming about an older car which is still driven regardless of the weather. This 1980 Pontiac LeMans looks like it’s even wearing snow tires on the rear. That paint scheme also makes it look eligible to be an army staff car should there ever be another Operation Desert Storm, Lol. Found this one in an Amherst parking lot. Jim Corbran, RRofWNY …and check out our Facebook page: No

RealRides of WNY

The personal luxury coupe was in its infancy when this 1970 Chevy Monte Carlo left the showroom. I think this trim — rally wheels, whitewalls, NO vinyl top — shows the car’s styling at its best. Rivals in 1970 were few: the Thunderbird, of course, and the Pontiac Grand Prix were probably its chief competition. This one was for sale last summer in Youngstown. Jim Corbran, RRofWNY …and check out our

RealRides of WNY

Not unusual, back when this 1969 Chevy Camaro Z/28 was new, to have a one-year styling cycle (okay, maybe a year-and-a-third, as the 1970 models didn’t appear until February). You might argue that the ‘69s were but a minor facelift of the ’67-’68 models, but we in this corner don’t buy it. As my Camaro-expert buddy and ’69 Z/28 owner Dave recently told me, this was the only year you could get the

RealRides Of WNY

Chrysler tried their best to keep up with Cadillac and Lincoln back in the fifties, but the sale numbers were never there. It probably didn’t help that they bounced their premier marque, of which this 1953 Chrysler Imperial is a prime example, back and forth between being a separate nameplate and being the most expensive Chrysler. They were also hurt by the fact that from a block away you couldn’t