Results for: AMERICAN MOTORS

RealRides of WNY - 1966 Rogue

While the 1966 Rambler Roguewas certainly no muscle car (standard engine was a 199cid inline six), it didadd a little glamour to the Rambler American lineup, and gave it a car to compete with the likes of Ford’s Falcon Futura and Chevy’s Corvair Monza. This was the third year for the American’s styling cycle, and it would soldier-on through the end of the line which culminated wi

RealRides of WNY - 1957 Hudson

When Nash and Hudson came together in 1954 to form American Motors, I doubt if Hudson fans had anticipated this outcome. Starting with the 1955 models, all Hudsons were Nash-based cars, like this 1957 Hudson Hornet Super Hollywood. Their relationship to each other is very evident in the greenhouse (see the Nash inset), but perusing somephotos one more time it looks like the trunklid (including the

RealRides of WNY - Jeep CJ-5

This Willys Jeep CJ-5, seen at the 2ndAnnual Cruisin’ at the Crossroadscar cruise at the Crossroads Christian Church in East Aurora, isfrom somewhere in the mid-1950s to 1963 (notes were taken that day, and notes were lost!). One clue is the “Willys” logo on the tailgate. Willys-Overland sold Jeep to Kaiser in 1963, so it’s no newer than that. Another clue is the dealer sti

RealRides of WNY - 1952 Hudson

When the Step-Down look debuted for MY 1948, predecessors of this 1952 Hudson Hornetlooked quite futuristic, especially when parked next to the pre-war holdover models of Plymouth, Ford, and Chevy. But by this time, the Big Three had restyled their lineups, and the fifth year of this look was getting old. It was an expensive look to update, which explains why the cash-starved Hudson couldn’t

RealRides of WNY - 1968 AMX

Where else would you go to find a 1968 AMC AMXbut the Mopar Classic Car Show, which was held last summer at Rose City Chrysler in Welland? Lol… I suppose in a roundabout way it’s not that strange, as Chrysler didend up buying American Motors from the French car maker Renault in 1987. Although AMC offered the two-seater AMX with racing stripes, I believe the ones featured on today&rsqu

RealRides of WNY - 1957 Rambler

When this 1957 Rambler Customwas new, The Big Three (GM, Ford, and Chrysler) were still the big three in sales, but competition from other American makes was hanging in there. American Motors was making Ramblers like this one, along with the larger Nash Ambassador and the very similar Hudson Hornet (both of which which would be phased out for 1958), as well the imported Nash Metropolitan two-seate

RealRides of WNY - 1964 Ambassador

The 1964 Rambler Ambassador 990was the top of the line from the Kenosha, Wisconsin automaker. (A 990H was available with a bit more potent engine and a more upscale interior). Unlike later Ambassadors, the ’64 models weren’t all that different outside from the lesser Rambler Classics. But, they didcome with standard V8 power — a 327cid rated at 250 hp. Rambler was the first Ameri

RealRides of WNY - 1967 Rogue

Talk about rare! American Motors made only 921 1967 Rambler American Rogueconvertibles, but we found one of them at this year’s Clutch Artists Summerama Car Showat the Lamm Post in Williamsville. This one’s got the optional 232cid inline six (a 199cid was standard), and appears to be wearing a Barbados Blue paint job. With a starting MSRP of just $2,872 the Rogue droptop was one of the

RealRides of WNY - 1963 Rambler

Came across this 1963 Rambler Classic 770yesterday while bicycling through Buffalo’s Elmwood Village. The big (relatively speaking) Ramblers were named Motor Trendmagazine’s Car of the Yearfor 1963. The folks from AMC described them thusly: “All New… All Beautiful… All Rambler!”Bigger than they looked, the Classics (and the similar Ambassador) were outwardly s

RealRides of WNY - 1954 Nash

Day 4 of Compacts Week…When you think of compacts, of course the Rambler American comes to mind. But before the American, which debuted for model year 1958, there was this swanky 1954 Nash Rambler Country Club. With styling by the Italian coachbuilder Carrozzeria Pininfarina, the small Rambler did what Kaiser’s Henry J and Willys’ Aero couldn’t do — sell compact cars