Results for: AMERICAN MOTORS

RealRides of WNY - 1965 Rambler

Ironically, as things would turn out in another dozen years or so, if this 1965 Rambler Classic 660had been purchased new in Europe, it would have been badged as a Rambler Renault Classic (see the brochure cover below), having been assembled from a CKD kit (completely knocked-down) in one of Renault’s Belgian assembly plants. (Renault and American Motors had a sort of merger in 1979, with th

RealRides of WNY - 1977 Pacer

If I was gonna drive one of these things, I’d want it to be an early model, which this 1977 AMC Paceris, from the years before the front end restyle. I’d also want it to be a station wagon, like this one seen in Tonawandaover the summer. This was the first year for the Pacer wagon, and the third year overall for the nameplate made famous in the movie “Wayne’s World.”A

RealRides of WNY - 1984 Fuego

When we crouched down to photograph this 1984 Renault Fuegoat the September to Remember Car Show/Swap Meetat the Orleans County Fairgrounds in Albion, we were asked “Are you interested in Fuegos?” “We’re interested in anything that’s different,” was our reply. And the Fuego is certainly different. You’re forgiven if you’ve never heard of nor seen one

RealRides of WNY - 1985 Eagle

Something seemed a little off when we found this 1985 AMC Eaglesitting in a Niagara Fallsparking lot over the summer. (And no, we’re not referring to that black hatchback lid.) A closer look revealed that the center cap on those rims said “Jeep.” Which is only fitting I guess, as at this point in time Jeep was still a part of American Motors, and the Eagle lineup was all 4-wheel-

RealRides of WNY - 1973 Javelin

Years ago there was a lot in Fredoniathat had half-a-dozen or so of these parked there, but when I passed through last month all I came across was this single Diamond Blue c1973 AMC Javelin— I’m not sure it was the same place, butit’s on the same stretch of road. AMC told us “It’s nice to know you’re driving a winner… But when we call the Javelin a winner

RealRides of WNY - 1957 Hudson

A close look at this 1957 Hudson Hornet Supershows that yes, it wasderived from its American Motors cousin, the Nash (it’s one of only 1,103 Super 4-door sedans to leave the factory that year). Bits were added on to the rear fender tops and quarter panel end caps to make them more fin-like, which was what 1957 car styling was all about. The front end is disguised better, but everything above

RealRides of WNY - 1966 Rogue

While the 1966 Rambler Roguewas certainly no muscle car (standard engine was a 199cid inline six), it didadd a little glamour to the Rambler American lineup, and gave it a car to compete with the likes of Ford’s Falcon Futura and Chevy’s Corvair Monza. This was the third year for the American’s styling cycle, and it would soldier-on through the end of the line which culminated wi

RealRides of WNY - 1957 Hudson

When Nash and Hudson came together in 1954 to form American Motors, I doubt if Hudson fans had anticipated this outcome. Starting with the 1955 models, all Hudsons were Nash-based cars, like this 1957 Hudson Hornet Super Hollywood. Their relationship to each other is very evident in the greenhouse (see the Nash inset), but perusing somephotos one more time it looks like the trunklid (including the

RealRides of WNY - Jeep CJ-5

This Willys Jeep CJ-5, seen at the 2ndAnnual Cruisin’ at the Crossroadscar cruise at the Crossroads Christian Church in East Aurora, isfrom somewhere in the mid-1950s to 1963 (notes were taken that day, and notes were lost!). One clue is the “Willys” logo on the tailgate. Willys-Overland sold Jeep to Kaiser in 1963, so it’s no newer than that. Another clue is the dealer sti

RealRides of WNY - 1952 Hudson

When the Step-Down look debuted for MY 1948, predecessors of this 1952 Hudson Hornetlooked quite futuristic, especially when parked next to the pre-war holdover models of Plymouth, Ford, and Chevy. But by this time, the Big Three had restyled their lineups, and the fifth year of this look was getting old. It was an expensive look to update, which explains why the cash-starved Hudson couldn’t