Results for: BEL AIR

RealRides of WNY - 1950 Ford

The 1950 Ford Custom Tudoris still a pretty clean design some 70 years after going on sale. It’s flat sides were über-modern compared to GM & Chrysler cars which still showed remnants of add-on rear quarter panels. The only thing Ford was missing in their redesigned ’49-50 lineup was a true two-door hardtop. Up to then they had made-do with a fancified two-door sedan they dubb

RealRides of WNY - 1973 Impala

When this 1973 Chevy Impalawas new, GM’s designers were most likely already working on the downsizing of their full-sized 1977 cars. But, in the meantime, the ‘73 Impala coupe was a mere two inches shorter than a 1965 Cadillac Coupe DeVille. Of course, by 1973 the Cadillac had grown another five inches. Longer, lower, and wider was goingto come to a screeching halt! For MY 1973, the bi

RealRides of WNY - 1958 Chevrolet

Yes, lower, wider, and longerwas an actual thing back in the 1958 American automobile advertising portfolio (see bottom of page). Case in point: the 1958 Chevrolet Impala Sport Coupe. New for ’58, and replacing the Bel Air at the top of the heap, Chevy told us the Impala was the “…newest heartthrob in sight. Longer by over nine inches, lower by more than two, the Impala, like ev

RealRides of WNY - 1956 Chevrolet

Of the famed Tri-Fives, I’ve always preferred these (maybe because I’m alsoa middle child). I’m guessing this particular 1956 Chevrolet Two-Tenwas involved in some sort of Bring Your Classic Car to Work Day, as we found it a few weeks ago parked in one of the many industrial parking lots of Tonawanda. The Two-Ten itselfwas a middle child — positioned between Chevy’s b

RealRides of WNY - 1959 Chevy Parkwood

It’s time for another edition of FormerWNYersFindingRealRides, this one courtesy of RealRides daughter Katie, whose ever-ready camera spotted this nifty 1959 Chevy Parkwood recently while waiting for traffic to pass in Seattle, Washington. The Brookwood was Chevy’s station wagon version of the Bel Air series, while the Kingswood lined up with the top-rung Impala, and the Brookwood with

RealRides of WNY - 1960 Chevy Nomad

For years Chevy had this thing about naming their station wagons. It was often a mix of regular model names, like the Two-Ten or Bel Air, with modifiers tacked on, like Handyman for the six-passenger and Townsman for the nine-passenger models. The top-line two-door Nomad arrived for 1955 and lasted two more years. In 1958, all the wagon names changed — Nomad was now an Impala-like four-door,