Results for: Dunkirk New York

RealRides of WNY #2398 - 1963 Pontiac

It was only the third year in for the nameplate, but already the 1963 Pontiac Tempest LeManswas growing in size. The Tempest lineup debuted for model year 1961 along with the Buick Special and Oldsmobile F-85, and as soon as they did they were dubbed senior compactsas they were bigger than the Ford Falcon, Chevy Corvair, and Chrysler Corporation’s Valiant, which were all true compacts. The t

RealRides of WNY #2373 - 1990 Country Squire

This 1990 Ford LTD Country Squirehearkens back to the day when the Dearborn manufacturer was known as The Wagon Master. They were known as The Wagon Masterbecause, well, that’s what they called themselves in a lot of their advertising — even in Europe (see below). But that being said, Ford didsell a lot of station wagons, going back to the suburban flight of the early 1950s. And the fa

RealRides of WNY #2364 - 1966 Catalina

The 1966 Pontiac Catalinawas a somewhat minor restyle of the 1965 cars (when the entire Pontiac Motor Division had been named “Car of the Year” by Motor Trendmagazine). The Catalina was Pontiac’s entry-level full size nameplate, and its lineup consisted of: two- and four-door sedans and hardtops, this convertible, and six- and nine-passenger station wagons. Other nameplates were

RealRides of WNY #2343 - 1964 Ambassador

The 1964 Rambler Ambassador 990was touted as the Kenosha manufacturer’s “...superb, limited-edition series.”It was basically the bread-and-butter Classic series with a standard V8, along with fancier trim and a nicer interior. In my humble opinion, it was a good value for just a $311 premium over the Classic 770 with an inline six… but from a half-block away your neighbors

RealRides of WNY# 2322 - 1979 Avanti II

The sign (right)which accompanied this 1979 Avanti IIat this year’s Harbor Cruise at Point Gratiot Park in Dunkirktells us that it’s one of only 142 built that year; meanwhile, the Encyclopedia of American Carssays the figure is 195. Either way, it’s a rare beast! The original Avanti (minus the Roman numeral) was built and sold by Studebaker for model years 1963 (3,834 built) and

RealRides of WNY #2295 - 1963 Rambler

This 1963 Rambler American 440-Hmarks the nameplate’s initial entry into the pillarless hardtop body style. As a matter of fact, the ’63 models would be the lone hardtop entries for these “Squamericans,” which were introduced for model year 1961, and replaced for 1964 by a whole new lineup of cars which were a bit larger and of a more rounded design. The 440-H was a notch a

RealRides of WNY - 1972 Olds

The badging on the 1972 Oldsmobile is a bit confusing. It is identified both as a Delta 88 and a Delta Royale. So we consulted Olds’ brochure, figuring they’re the experts. Turns out it’s a Delta 88 Royale— the only full-sized convertible on offer that year (see brochure illustration below).Non-Royale Delta 88s didn’t have the snazzy fake louvers on the front fenders,

RealRides of WNY - 1980 Avanti II

This 1980 Avanti IIwas spotted back in 2016 at a Studebaker swap meet in Dunkirk. This one of course, isn’t technically a Studebaker, as they stopped building cars after the 1966 model year. The original Avanti (minus the Roman numeral) went out of production after MY 1964, but the tooling was bought by a group of South Bend Studebaker dealers (South Bend being Studebaker’s home). The

RealRides of WNY - 1952 Pontiac

Inquiring minds (mine) want to know about the headlight bezels on this 1952 Pontiac Chieftain De Luxe. They certainly don’t match the ones on the cars in that year’s brochure. I did find one other car on the WikipediaPontiac page that seems to have the same ones; also a ’53 Plymouth Cranbrook (which doesn’t match the ’53 Plymouth brochure illustrations either) —

RealRides of WNY - 1965 Falcon

This 1965 Ford Falcon Futurahardtop had some pretty stiff in-house competition fromthe Mustang, which was introduced in April of 1964. Roughly the same size (the Falcon was a tad longer) and offering most of the same powertrains, the Mustang’s debut didn’t bode well for Ford’s venerable compact. It did have a few advantages going for it, however. Along with the extra length, Falc