Results for: Dunkirk New York

RealRides of WNY - 1972 Olds

The badging on the 1972 Oldsmobile is a bit confusing. It is identified both as a Delta 88 and a Delta Royale. So we consulted Olds’ brochure, figuring they’re the experts. Turns out it’s a Delta 88 Royale— the only full-sized convertible on offer that year (see brochure illustration below).Non-Royale Delta 88s didn’t have the snazzy fake louvers on the front fenders,

RealRides of WNY - 1980 Avanti II

This 1980 Avanti IIwas spotted back in 2016 at a Studebaker swap meet in Dunkirk. This one of course, isn’t technically a Studebaker, as they stopped building cars after the 1966 model year. The original Avanti (minus the Roman numeral) went out of production after MY 1964, but the tooling was bought by a group of South Bend Studebaker dealers (South Bend being Studebaker’s home). The

RealRides of WNY - 1952 Pontiac

Inquiring minds (mine) want to know about the headlight bezels on this 1952 Pontiac Chieftain De Luxe. They certainly don’t match the ones on the cars in that year’s brochure. I did find one other car on the WikipediaPontiac page that seems to have the same ones; also a ’53 Plymouth Cranbrook (which doesn’t match the ’53 Plymouth brochure illustrations either) —

RealRides of WNY - 1965 Falcon

This 1965 Ford Falcon Futurahardtop had some pretty stiff in-house competition fromthe Mustang, which was introduced in April of 1964. Roughly the same size (the Falcon was a tad longer) and offering most of the same powertrains, the Mustang’s debut didn’t bode well for Ford’s venerable compact. It did have a few advantages going for it, however. Along with the extra length, Falc

RealRides of WNY - 1953 Studebaker

This appears to be a 1953 Studebaker Champion Regal Starlight Coupe. I say appears to bebecause it seems to have the grille of a ’53 while wearing the C-pillar trim and chrome roof two-tone break-line pieces from a 1954 model. (Sometimes I think they do this to me on purpose!)We saw this nice example, from Pennsylvania, a few years ago at a Studebaker swap meet in Dunkirk, where it was in th

RealRides of WNY - 1980 El Camino

Saw this pretty well-preserved 1980 Chevy El Caminolast summer in the parking lot of a swap meet in Dunkirk. I could never understand why this body style faded from popularity here in North America. The modern-era car/truck was begun by Ford for MY 1957, and followed by Chevy for 1959. In Australia, the ute, as it’s known Down Under, was still popular well into the twenty-teens, with version

RealRides of WNY - 1956 Apache

Saw this 1956 Chevy Apache 3100pickup last summer at a Dunkirkswap meet. This was the half-ton, 114” wheelbase model; another half-ton model with a wheelbase almost ten inches longer was called 3200. There were also ¾-ton and one-ton models (3600 & 3800) that came with the longer wheelbase & bed. For the dandies of the day, there was the Cameo Carrier (bottom of page),another

RealRides of WNY - 1971 Grand Prix

The 1971 Pontiac Grand Prix Jwas in the second-last year of its ground-breaking body style which had been introduced for MY 1969. It can probably be credited with making the personal luxury coupe genre popular with the masses. It still had the v-e-r-y long hood and the short deck of the introductory model; and under that hood was a standard 400cid V8. If that wasn’t enough power for you, the

RealRides of WNY - 1973 Nova

Hard to believe that this “compact” 1973 Chevrolet Nova Customis roughly the same size as a ’55 Bel Air — which at the time was a full-sized car. How do the specs stack up? (all figures are for 2-door sedans; the '74 Nova specs are the same as the '73)You can see from the table how styling can affect interior room. The '55has a four-inch longer wheelbase, with more leg room

RealRides of WNY - 1967 Newport

When James Rado and Gerome Ragni wrote the opening lines to the first song in the Broadway musical Hair, they took a bit of a poetic license in proclaiming "the dawning of the age of Aquarius." Astrologists have for years called itgibberish — all of that Moon in the Seventh Houseand Jupiter aligning with Marsjazz. However, there’s no disputing the fact (using a little poetic license of