Results for: EDSEL

RealRides of WNY - 1957 Mercury

Since their debut for MY 1939, Mercurys were pretty much “fancier Fords” (except for 1949-51) with styling different enough to hide most of the similarities. But when this 1957 Mercury Montclairhit the showrooms, it marked a departure — a longer wheelbase and its own body shell moved it up a notch in the medium-priced field. Of course, this was done mainly so the following year F

RealRides of WNY - 1963 Mercury Comet

This Mercury Cometwas seen a few years back in a Niagara Fallsdriveway, wearing a set of Ohio Historical Vehicle Plates and doing double-duty as a quasi-depository for some cleaning supplies. It appears, from the fender trim and hood script, to be a 1963model sporting a 1962 grille insert. This (1963) was the second year that the Falcon-based Comet was officially badged as a Mercury. For its first

IT ONLY LOOKS LIKE A MERCURY — 1961 Comet

IT ONLY LOOKS LIKE A MERCURY— 1961 Comet by Jim CorbranIf you’re at one of the many classic car shows this summer in WNY , and want to see something uncommon — uncommon anywhere these days as well as uncommon at car shows where there you’ll find many Tri-Five Chevys, Hemi Mopars, and two-seat Thunderbirds — ask around to see if Steven Botsford is there.Who?Actually, i

RealRides of WNY - 1964 Mercury Comet

(Day 5 of FeelingBluWeek)For today we’ve saved what just might be the bluest car we’ve featured all week. This 1964 Mercury Comet Caliente was the Big M’s compact drop-top, a post it held through much of the decade. The Comet started life as a cousin to Ford’s Falcon in 1960 (actually, if you go back even farther, the Comet was supposed to be an Edsel, but we all know how t

RealRides of WNY - 1947 Mercury

Here’s one from the You Don’t See One of These Everyday department, a 1947 Mercury, spotted at a recent Thursday Olean Center Mall Cruise Night. The Mercury debuted in 1939 as Ford’s attempt to try and compete with GM at every price point — so now they had Ford, Mercury, and Lincoln. In the late 50s would come the — gasp! — Edsel, to fill another gap. Or so they