Results for: FORD MUSTANG

RealRides of WNY - 1968 Barracuda

Regular readers of this space have undoubtedly heard the story of what I consider my first realcar (yes, it’s a l-o-n-gstory), which was similar in body style to this 1968 Plymouth Formula S Barracuda, but was a ’67 in Bright Blue Poly with a matching interior (and it wasn’t a Formula S). The Barracuda was based on the compact Valiant (much like the Ford Mustang was based on the

RealRides of WNY - 1964 Comet

Ironically, this 1964 Mercury Comet Calientewas parked right behind a first-generation Ford Mustang at a Sunday cruise-in at the Big Indian Smoke Shop this past October in Irving. I say ironically, as it was probably theMustang which put the kibosh on high-end sporty compacts like this Caliente, as well as Ford’s Falcon Sprint, Dodge’s Dart GT, and the Chevy Corvair Monza. After all, a

RealRides of WNY - 1965 Barracuda

There wasn’t a huge difference between the 1965 Plymouth Barracudaseen here and the 1964 model which preceded it. Probably because it was introduced late in the ’64 model year, just a couple of weeks before Ford introduced the Mustang if I remember correctly. The differences between the ’64 and ’65 models lie mainly in what you see in the inset photo: the debut cars had a V

RealRides of WNY - 1965 Falcon

This 1965 Ford Falcon Futurahardtop had some pretty stiff in-house competition fromthe Mustang, which was introduced in April of 1964. Roughly the same size (the Falcon was a tad longer) and offering most of the same powertrains, the Mustang’s debut didn’t bode well for Ford’s venerable compact. It did have a few advantages going for it, however. Along with the extra length, Falc

RealRides of WNY - 1964 Falcon

With summer right around the corner, at least calendarically, this 1964 Ford Falcon Futuramight be just what you’re looking for. We came across it a few weeks ago while bicycling through the WestSide of Buffalo. It’s wearing a couple of for salesigns, and looks like it might need a bit of work but hey, it’s a convertible! The Falcon, you may remember, especially the sportier Futu

RealRides of WNY - 1973 Cougar

This 1973 Mercury Cougar XR-7marked the marque’s final year of sharing a platform with Ford’s Mustang. This was also the final year for a Cougar convertible (below). The Mustang moved to the Pinto platform for MY 1974 and morphed into the Mustang II. Mercury decided to go in the other direction with their pony car and moved it to the mid-sized Montego platform, where it became sort of

RealRides of WNY - 1966 Ford Falcon

Day 6 of Compacts Week…This 1966 Ford Falcon Futura Sports Coupeis one of 182,669 Falcons produced that year. Sounds like a respectable number, until you look at Falcon’s debut year of 1960 when 473,841 of them left the factory. By 1966 the Falcon’s numbers had to have been hurt by the sporty Mustang, which sat in the same showroom and could be had for only $88 more than the buc

RealRides of WNY - 1965 Plymouth Barracuda

Day 5 of Discontinued Marques Week…When this 1965 Plymouth Barracuda was new, who’d-a thought that 37 years later the Plymouth name would drive off into the horizon (pun intended). The Barracuda, as you might remember, preceded the Ford Mustang into what was still the unnamed genre of automobile which would evolve into the pony car. It was heavily based on Plymouth’s compact Val

RealRides of WNY - 1967 Mercury Cougar

Day 1 of Discontinued Marques Week…This 1967 Mercury Cougarwas found last June at a weekly Cruising on the QTuesday night event on Queen Street in Niagara Falls, Ontario. This was the Cougar’s first year, and it was based on Ford’s popular Mustang. Bigger, more posh, and costlier than its Ford cousin, the Cougar helped spawn the upper crust pony car category, along with Dodge&rs

RealRides of WNY - 1997 Toyota Celica

Is it all that old? Certainly not, but when was the last time you saw a 1997 Toyota Celicaout and about? It was a car originally thought of by some automotive journalists as the Japanese answer to the Ford Mustang. But by 1997, like most small imported cars, Celicas weredriven by front-wheel-drive, andpowered by either a 1.8L (in the base ST model) or a 2.2L four (in the GT), and a far cry from th