Results for: Grand Island

RealRides of WNY - 1986 Chrysler LeBaron

There was a time back in the mid-1970s when it was thought that the convertible body style was dead. This 1986 Chrysler LeBaronis a descendent of the ’82 model, which is considered by many to have ushered in the rebirth of the drop-top body style after most had thought the 1976 Cadillac Eldorado was the last of its kind. Federal safety regulations which would have made this body style imprac

RealRides of WNY - 1964 Oldsmobile Dynamic 88

Love these big old GM cars from my youth. This one’s a 1964 Oldsmobile Dynamic 88, seen a few weeks ago on Grand Island. It wasn’t the cheapest full-sized Olds you could buy in 1964, nor was it the most expensive. But it was the only big Olds available in all of the body styles: four-door sedan, two- and four-door hardtop, convertible, and station wagon.Jim Corbran, RRofWNYGot a RealRi

RealRides of WNY - 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S

This 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S marks the first year that General Motors offered their mid-sized cars with different wheelbases for the two- and four-door models. The two-door coupes, hardtops, and convertibles rode a 112-inch wheelbase, while the wagon, and four-door sedans and the hardtop had a 116-inch span. Vista Cruiser station wagons, based on the F-85/Cutlass body style, had a 121-inch wheel

RealRides of WNY - 1972 Dodge Coronet

Our week of the 1970s continues with this work-in-progress 1972 Dodge Coronet Custom station wagon. The Custom sat in the middle of the Coronet wagon lineup for 1972, in between the base Coronet and the pricier, wood-grained Coronet Crestwood (all Coronet wagons came standard with a 318CIDV8). The Coronet was a mid-sized line, but its wagons were Dodge’s smallest that were domestically-produ

RealRides of WNY - 1950 Chrysler New Yorker

If you’re wondering why this 1950 Chrysler New Yorker is so upright and boxy-looking compared to some of its competition, blame (or, credit) Chrysler Corporation president K.T. Keller, who, it’s said, proclaimed that you should be able to wear your hat inside your car. Looking at these things there’s no denying that it could probably be done — well, maybe not Abraham Lincol