Results for: NORTH TONAWANDA NEW YORK

RealRides of WNY - 1965 Coronet

Back when this 1965 Dodge Coronet 440was new, it was pretty much just another family car. Do a Google search for one now, and see what turns up. Most of them — yes, even the four-door sedans and station wagons, have been modified with different wheel & tire combos, and a more-powerful V8 engine than it likely left the factory with. Try and find one like the brochure photo below. Good luc

RealRides of WNY- 1986 560 SL

One big difference between the German and U.S. versions of the 1986 Mercedes-Benz 560 SL is spelled out in the brochure: “In die Leuchteinheiten sind Halogenscheinwerfer mit asymmetrischem Alllicht und integrierten großflächigen Blinkern integriert.” Oh, sorry. That’s the German brochure. It’s explaining the German/Euro versions’ asymmetrical halogen headli

RealRides of WNY - 1994 Cutlass

The people who put together the brochure for the 1994 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supremeconvertible, if nothing else, sure had a lot of moxie. Right there on page three, alongside a listing of the Olds ragtop’s specs, is a chart comparing it to the BMW 325i and Saab 900 Turbo — which Olds labels a “Sport-Luxury Convertible Comparison.” Call me pessimistic, but I highly doubt that m

RealRides of WNY - Pontiac Bonneville

When the eighth-generation Pontiac Bonneville (1987-1991)was introduced, it was quite a departure from previous models. For starters, it was now a front-drive, four-door sedan-only nameplate with a standard 3.8L Buick V6 under the hood. Appearancewise, not much changed over the run of five years; the car would get another complete makeover for MY 1992. The 1987 brochure provided the photo you see

RealRides of WNY - 1964 Dodge 880

This 1964 Dodge 880 Customexisted to fill a hole in Dodge’s lineup created when Chrysler downsized its bigPlymouth & Dodge lineups back in 1962. Although they seemed to like buying compacts, the public wasn’t ready yet for smaller big cars, and the Furys, Polaras, et al. didn’t sell well. Dodge dealers, who had no equivalent of the big Chrysler in their showrooms like Plymout

RealRides of WNY - Herschell Carrousel Car

This past summer we took some friends from Rochester to the Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum (right)in North Tonawanda(just over the Erie Canal Bridge from the RealRidesWorld Headquarters) for a tour. Came across this Carrousel Carin one of the displays, and yesterday while browsing eBay found someone selling an entirecarrousel ride, in working order with 10 cars including two fire ladder cars,

RealRides of WNY - 1955 Mercury

The 1955 Mercury Montclairwas the only convertible available that year in the lineup of The Big M. Okay, so Mercury didn’t start using The Big Mmoniker in its advertising until 1956, but they were basically still the same cars. For 1955, Mercury produced 10,668 drop-tops, with a starting MSRP of $2,712, all equipped with Mercury’s 292cid V8. Okay, you got me again. It was actually Ford

RealRides of WNY - 1949 International

Not every post-war pickup buyer in the U.S. drove off the lot in a Ford, Chevy/GMC, or Dodge. This 1949 International KB-2is just one example from the Ohio manufacturer of trucks who was also well-known for their farm implements. The KB-2 is a 3/4 ton model; there were also KB-1 (1/2-ton), and KB-3 (one ton) models in the light pickup line. The KB series included heavier-duty models up to the nume

RealRides of WNY - 1977 Toronado

At a glance, this 1977 Oldsmobile Toronado Broughamdoesn’t seem to share much with the ground-breaking debut model which bowed for model year 1966. Yes, it still has a v-e-r-y long hood with a proportionately shorter rear deck. But this ’77 is a much bigger car — 227inches long compared to the 1966 car’s 211” length. Width increased an inch-and-a-half, but the squared

RealRides of WNY - 1938 Dodge

What’s the difference, you may ask, between this 1938 Dodge Touring Sedanand a regularfour-door sedan? This one has what Dodge called a built-in trunk, seen in the photo above as the bulge in the rear. Regular sedans’ rear ends went straight to the bumper from the rear window (see the 1937 at the bottom of page).Dodge employed many celebrities to tout their wares in the 1930s — i