Results for: Orchard Park New York

RealRides of WNY - 1956 Buick

Is it just my imagination or do we seem to see more continental kits on 1950s-era cars today than we did back in the 1950s? Just a thought. This 1956 Buick Specialsure looks spiffy though, sporting what’s probably an aftermarket kit in the back, along with one of the Flint carmaker'stwo-tone paint jobs. Buick also had some other great color combinations back in the day, as witnessed below in

RealRides of WNY - 1963 Nova SS

The front fender badge (like the one in the inset) on this 1963 Chevrolet Chevy II Nova 400 SSseems to indicate that it has the Hi-Thrift 194cid inline six under the hood. This engine was standard on all Nova 400 models, including the Super Sport (which was still an option package for the Nova 400 for model year 1963; the Nova SS would become a separate model for 1964.) The 90-hp Super-Thrift inli

RealRides of WNY - 1986 Jeep

When this 1986 Jeep Grand Wagoneerwas new, Jeep called it “Beyond Luxury.”True, it did contain just about every feature offered by American Motors at the time; AMC went on to tell us the Grand Wagoneer was “…the most completely equipped, most elegantly appointed full-size wagon you can buy.”By this time though, at the other end of the showroom was the Eagle 4WD stati

RealRides of WNY - 1996 Tracker

Coming across this 1996 Geo Trackerconvertible marked the first time I can remember seeing a Geo at a cruise night/car show. We saw it at this summer’s Quaker Days Car Showin Orchard Park, where the owner told us that it’s never seen a winter, which would explain its appearance. Also sold as the Suzuki Sidekick, the Tracker was a four-wheel-drive mini SUV which was largely produced by

RealRides of WNY - 1958 Ford

This 1958 Ford Custom 300Tudorwas spotted at the 2018 Quaker Days car show in Orchard Park. It’s one of the many classic hunks of iron owned by Gowanda’s Steven Botsford, a regular attendee of area cruise nights/car shows. This two-door features a few items out of Ford’s 1958 accessories brochure: deluxe rear deck antenna, fender shields (skirts), gunsight fender ornaments, and F

RealRides of WNY - 1967 Skylark

This 1967 Buick Skylarkis just one of the many mid-sized cars the Flint manufacturer was offering 53 years ago. In one brochure, actress Delores Wettach told us “I’d put my dog in it and go for long rides in the country… anywhere. Or better yet, I’d use it to take my mother to Alaska in.”Model Penny Ashton was featured singing the praises of the low-end Buick Special

RealRides of WNY - 1962 F-85

This 1962 Olds F-85 Cutlassmarks the second year forone of Olds’ most successful nameplates. Introduced the year before as a top-of-the-line Club Coupe only, for MY 1962 the Cutlass lineup expanded to include a convertible. By the middle of the decade it would also include sedans, hardtops, & wagons, and by the end of the decade the Cutlass line would be Olds’ biggest-selling namep

RealRides of WNY - 1952 Chevrolet

This 1952 Chevrolet Styline De Luxeis just one more reminder of how colorful cars could be if the manufacturers would lose the black/white/gray palette they seem so enamored with these days. Today’s RealRide is decked-out in what looks like Spring Green over Emerald Green. And you can’t tell from here, but in 1952 if your Chevy was green on the outside, the interior likely matched. See

RealRides of WNY- 1967 F-85

You might not think soto look at this 1967 Oldsmobile F-85 Club Coupe, but it was the Lansing Division’s least-expensive offering that year, with a starting MSRP of just $2,410 with the 155-hp Action-Line 6(only 5,349 produced) or $2,480 with the 250-hp Jetfire Rocket V-8(6,700 produced). Olds told us in the brochure that the F-85 line was “…priced to make going Olds almost as e

RealRides of WNY - 1975 Omega

The 1975 Oldsmobile Omegawas “A lot of little Olds”as the folks from Lansing told us in their advertising. Although it was only a very thinlydisguised Chevy Nova, it didhave some distinctive Olds touches: its front end looked a lot like the supremely popular Cutlass (see what we did there?), right down to the swingaway grille (below), which moved back on minor impacts. The rear treatme