Results for: Pickup Truck

RealRides of WNY - Ford F-1, c1948

This Ford F-1, c1948, was advertised as “The Master of A Thousand-and-One Light Delivery Jobs!”The F-1 was Ford’s light-duty half-ton pickup, available with either a 95-hp six or a 100-hp V-8. Ford told us that, equipped with the six, “Engine speed at 35 m.p.h. is an economical 1,600 r.p.m.”Other features included: “no-catch rolled-edge flare-boards,” &ldq

RealRides of WNY - 1964 Ford F-250

By the time this 1964 Ford F-250Stylesidehit the showroom, pickups were beginning to be a little more user-friendly. Although still a far cry from today’s expensive-as-a-house behemoths, Ford asked “Do you need big-truck toughness in your pickup, but want the riding smoothness of a car?”The Ford pickup’s two-stage rear springs and long wheelbase made “…a ride t

RealRides of WNY - 1977 Dodge D150

Ah, the internet. ‘Tis a lovely thing when you’re doing research — except when all of your sources contradict each other. Case in point: this 1977 Dodge D150 Midnite Expresspickup. According to the web: It was available only for model year 1978 It was a dealer-installed package available only in the mid-west It was a dealer-installed package available only on the west coast It w

RealRides of WNY - SsangYong Actyon, c2008

And now for something completely different — a SsangYong Actyon Sport Truck, c2008. A what!? No, that name’s not a typo. (Nor is it a Pontiac Aztek pickup, Lol...) SsangYong is a Korean manufacturer which has never officially exported vehicles to the U.S., however, around 200 were brought here without drivetrains by a California concern to be converted to electric power (according to o

RealRides of WNY - 1963 Ford Ranchero

Day 3 of Compacts Week…As this 1963 Ford Rancheropoints out, not all early American compacts were sedans or station wagons. Or hardtops or convertibles, for that matter. The Ranchero was Ford’s car/pickup hybrid, introduced for 1957 and moved over to the Falcon platform when the compact debuted for model year 1960. When the ’57 made its first appearance, Chevy wasn’t able

RealRides of WNY - 1956 Chevrolet 3100

For the second day in a row we’re featuring a RealRidethat looks like it drove right out of that year’s brochure (see bottom photo)— this time it’s a 1956 Chevrolet 3100 Task Forcepickup. In the second year of a total restyle, this ’56 featured: a panoramic windshield, doors which concealed safety steps, and high-level ventilation. Standard engine was Chevy’s Th

RealRides of WNY - 1967 Ford Ranger

Found this 1967 Ford Ranger 100pickup poking out of a Tonawandacarport last fall. The Ranger was the new-for-1967, top-of-the-line trim level for Ford’s Styleside pickups, years before Ford’s new 1983 compact pickup would use the same moniker (replacing the Mazda-made Ford Courier). Recently, the Ranger name has been revived (again) for another smaller truck in North America, this time

RealRides of WNY (on the road) - 1987 Jeep Comanche

How opportune that we came across this 1987Jeep Comanche Pioneerwhile FCA (Fiat Chrysler Automobiles) was in the midst of launching a new, updated version based on the tried-and-true Wrangler. The original Comanche was introduced by American Motors (who at the time still owned Jeep; Chrysler bought AMC in the spring of 1987) for model year 1986. It was based on the mid-sized Cherokee, and was sold

RealRides of WNY - 1985 Ford F-150

This 1985 Ford F-150may have been just the thing to have this past weekend for driving over and/or through the many snow drifts which visited WNY. The ’85 Ford pickups were a far cry from today’s super-luxe dude trucks with their high-fallutin’ interiors and too-nice-to-throw-stuff-into cargo beds. Here’s a partial list of the standard equipment which Ford saw fit to brag a

RealRides of WNY - 1966 Chevrolet Stepside

This photograph, taken a couple of summers ago in downtown North Tonawanda, still manages to do this 1966 Chevy Stepsidejustice even though I believe we were still using a flip-phone. A flip-phone!In 2016! Chevy offered the Stepside in 2- or 4-wheel drive, with a choice of 6-1/2- or 8-foot beds on the half- and three-quarter ton models, along with a 9-foot bed on the one-ton. Suffice it to say, th