Results for: TWO DOOR SEDAN

RealRides of WNY - 1952 Chevrolet

Cars from the year of one’s birth are always just a tad more interesting, IMO. Like this 1952 Chevrolet Fleetline DeLuxe,whichwas the last of its breed (that breed being the full-sized fastback body style which was popular back in the 1940s). The Fleetline was one of seven different body styles offered by Chevy for MY 1952, along with: two-door versions of the sedan, sport coupe, hardtop, an

RealRides of WNY - 1966 Falcon

The brochure told us that as far as the 1966 Ford Falcon Futura Sports Coupewas concerned, its “No. 1 feature is economy… traditional Falcon all the way!”Probably a wise decision by the marketing folks, as by 1966, for just 88 bucks more you could have a Mustang hardtop. So, as sporty as the Futura Sports Coupe was, it was still pretty much Aunt Ethel’s Falcon with a pair

RealRides of WNY - 1962 Falcon

This 1962 Ford Falcon, seen some time ago in Kenmore, sports one of two different rooflines offered on the ’62 two-door models. This one dates back to the original Falcon which was introduced for MY 1960. As you can see at the bottom of the page, a newer style, introduced half-way through the ‘62 model year, mimics those seen on the Thunderbird and Galaxie models. We especially like th

RealRides of WNY - 1965 VW

When we came across this 1965 VWat last fall’s final Big Indian car cruise in Irving, we never guessed it belonged to Gowanda’s Steven Botsford. The last time we ran into him he had a ’63 Sedan DeVille, which is pretty much the polar opposite of the Beetle. (Check our back posts for some of his other interesting rides.) He told us this one had recently been purchased from a selle

RealRides of WNY - 1960 Chevrolet

When we saw this 1960 Chevrolet(with a Texas tag) in Akronlast fall, we left scratching our head. The front fender trim looks like it's from anImpala, yet the trim which edges the tailfin from the back of the car into the door tells meit's aBel Air;but,the unadorned cove where the taillights are located is more like aBiscayne,as isthe lack of a chrome spear along the rear quarter panel which on th

RealRides of WNY - 1955 Ford

Growing up, my godparents had a similar 1955 Ford Customline Tudor, except theirs had a two-tone paint job (as many were back in the day) — Buckskin Brown and Snowshoe White, IIRC. Back in those days many owners were brand-loyal, and Uncle Chick (as we called him) was a dyed-in-the-wool Ford guy right up to the end. This striking Torch Red RealRidewas seen a few weeks ago in a Tonawandaparki

RealRides of WNY - 1954 Pontiac

A pair of fender skirts (along with their extended chrome trim along the bottom of the rear quarter panels) give this 1954 Pontiac Chieftain Specialthe look of a higher-end model. You can see what a Chieftain Special looked like without the skirts at the bottom of the page. It makes quite a difference! The next steps up in the lineup were the Chieftain DeLuxe, which had much more chrome side trim

RealRides of WNY - 1951 Ford

This 1951 Ford Customis from the car’s third and final year of its styling cycle. Confusingly (to me at least), the Custom was the top-line series while the Deluxe was the cheaper one. A feature of the ’51 Fords which I’m surprised didn’t catch on was the “Chanalited Instrument Cluster,” about which Ford told us “When head or parking lights are on, car spe

RealRides of WNY - 1958 Ford

This 1958 Ford Custom 300Tudorwas spotted at the 2018 Quaker Days car show in Orchard Park. It’s one of the many classic hunks of iron owned by Gowanda’s Steven Botsford, a regular attendee of area cruise nights/car shows. This two-door features a few items out of Ford’s 1958 accessories brochure: deluxe rear deck antenna, fender shields (skirts), gunsight fender ornaments, and F

RealRides of WNY - 1949 Hudson

This 1949 Hudson Commodore Club Coupeis from year two of the marque’s Step-Downstyling cycle, which was meant to be their version of the “longer, lower, wider” mantra which was about to overtake Detroit (see below for Step-Down explanation). And the new Hudsons actually werelonger, lower, and wider than their predecessors. But not quite as muchlonger, lower, and wider as their ad