Results for: WILLIAMSVILLE NEW YORK

RealRides of WNY - 1957 Rambler

When this 1957 Rambler Customwas new, The Big Three (GM, Ford, and Chrysler) were still the big three in sales, but competition from other American makes was hanging in there. American Motors was making Ramblers like this one, along with the larger Nash Ambassador and the very similar Hudson Hornet (both of which which would be phased out for 1958), as well the imported Nash Metropolitan two-seate

RealRides of WNY - 1964 Spitfire

Probably one of the prettiest little cars on the market at the time, this 1964 Triumph Spitfire 4was also known as the Spitfire Mark I. Under the full forward-tilt hood was an OHV inline-four engine of 1,147cc (70cid) with twin carburetors. Certainly not much when compared to what was coming out of Detroit at the time, but then again, the car weighed less that 1,600 lbs. A bit of an upgrade from s

RealRides of WNY - 1967 Rogue

Talk about rare! American Motors made only 921 1967 Rambler American Rogueconvertibles, but we found one of them at this year’s Clutch Artists Summerama Car Showat the Lamm Post in Williamsville. This one’s got the optional 232cid inline six (a 199cid was standard), and appears to be wearing a Barbados Blue paint job. With a starting MSRP of just $2,872 the Rogue droptop was one of the

RealRides of WNY - Town & Country, c1977

Spotted this Chrysler Town & Country, c1977, pulling out of a Williamsvilleparking lot a few weeks ago. This was a b-i-gstation wagon! Actually, Chrysler told us in their advertising that it was “…really more than a wagon. It (was) an ultimate expression of luxury motoring.”With 102.4 cubic feet of cargo space, the T&C was capable of doing something that most of today&rs

RealRides of WNY - 1977 Monte Carlo

This 1977 Chevrolet Monte Carlorepresents the Bow Tie manufacturer’s final year for the big personal luxury coupe. No, not the Monte’sfinal year — merely the year before downsizing hit GM’s mid-sized cars, including Chevy's entry. For MY 1977, Chevy informed us that “…personal-size car referred less to size than to state of mind… appealing to a particula

RealRides of WNY - 1951 Ford

Yes, in the 1950s, American automobile manufacturers were known for offering some very colorful factory paintjobs. But, I don’t think this 1951 Ford Customis necessarily wearing one of them. Ford offered three different greens for 1951: Sea Island, Sportsman, and Greenbrier. Today’s RealRidelooks more like the Skyhaze Green which was available in 1955. Looks sharp, though, especially w

RealRides of WNY - 1972 Sedan DeVille

To show you just how things have changed since this1972 Cadillac Sedan DeVillewas new, if you were so inclined you could equip it with power door locks at extra cost. Today all but the cheapest of the cheap cars come standard with power windows, locks, and outside mirrors. Of course, today’s cheapest of the cheap do notcome with Majesty Clothor Medley Clothinteriors — at any price! Thi

RealRides of WNY - 1976 Pontiac Bonneville

You might not think so to look at it, but this 1976 Pontiac Bonnevillehas been described as “…a great road car.”(Full disclosure: it was Pontiac who described it that way.) That, IMO, is open to wide interpretation. Yes, you candrive it on the road, Lol. But when thinking of great road cars of the mid-1970s, my mind wanders more towards BMW’s 2002, Volkswagen’s Sciro

RealRides of WNY - 1938 Chevrolet

While doing a little research on this 1938 Chevrolet Standardcoupe, I believe I came across the web page where it was listed for sale a while back. If you’re looking at the photos and scratching your head, know that this is not your Grandfather’s Chevy — it’s a right-hand drive Chevrolet built and sold by GM's Holden subsidiary in Australia, and according to the web page wh

RealRides of WNY - 1988 Ford Country Squire

Back when this 1988 Ford LTD Country Squirewas new, the Blue Oval folks were still singing the praises of the versatility of the 3-way doorgate. And why not? Ford was the first to offer it back on their 1966 models across the line. Then known as the Magic Doorgate, it was standard on Fairlane and full-sized Ford wagons, and optional on the compact Falcon. As my 1966 Buyer’s Digest of New Car