Results for: Youngstown, New York

RealRides of WNY - 1964 Ford F-250

By the time this 1964 Ford F-250Stylesidehit the showroom, pickups were beginning to be a little more user-friendly. Although still a far cry from today’s expensive-as-a-house behemoths, Ford asked “Do you need big-truck toughness in your pickup, but want the riding smoothness of a car?”The Ford pickup’s two-stage rear springs and long wheelbase made “…a ride t

RealRides of WNY - SsangYong Actyon, c2008

And now for something completely different — a SsangYong Actyon Sport Truck, c2008. A what!? No, that name’s not a typo. (Nor is it a Pontiac Aztek pickup, Lol...) SsangYong is a Korean manufacturer which has never officially exported vehicles to the U.S., however, around 200 were brought here without drivetrains by a California concern to be converted to electric power (according to o

RealRides of WNY - 1967 Datsun 1600

Before the legendary 240Z there was the Datsun 1600(this one appears to be a 1967model), a two-seat open sports car which was called by the more genteel name Fairladyin its home market of Japan. The Fairlady’s official designation was Sports 1600, with the numerical suffix referring to its 1600cc engine; which means of course that previous (and subsequent) models were named differently &mdas

RealRides of WNY - 1960 Ford Falcon

With debut-year sales of more than 435,000 units, it’s not a stretch to say that most of us (of a certain age) probably knew someonewho drove a 1960 Falcon. Although it may not have had the aftermarket wheels and paintjob of this one, seen a few years ago in Youngstown, it would still have been an affordable (starting MSRP of $1,912), cheap-to-drive, sensibly-sized vehicle in an age where ca

RealRides of WNY - Saab 96, c1966

There was a time when many foreign makes were what we Americans considered to be funny-shaped little cars. This Saab 96, c1966, is just one example. Its shape wasn’t the only thing foreign to many US car owners; under the hood was a three-cylinder, two-stroke engine of 51.3 cu. in. which was rated at a massive44 hp. To top that off, optional was a four-speed manual transmission with a column

RealRides of WNY - Chrysler LeBaron, c1984

It’s rather remarkable how many of these Chrysler LeBaronconvertibles, c1984, are still around. After the American convertible had been declared dead following the 1976 model year, Chrysler head Lee Iacocca took a chance to revive his ailing company by bringing out a pair of compact droptops — the LeBaron and its cousin Dodge 400. They promptly sold around 20,000 of them that first yea