Realrides Of WNY

RealRides Of WNY

It’s been awhile since we’ve featured one of these, and this beautiful 1965 Ford Mustang is as good of an example as you’ll probably find — especially in this part of the country (okay, it’s from Arizona, but it’s still here). The fender badge indicates the popular 289 V-8, and it also sports the optional styled steel wheels (with whitewalls). Over a half-million of these were sold the first year

RealRides Of WNY

I’m always happy to find a car that’s older than I am, like this 1937 Ford Fordor. This example, seen over the summer in Sanborn, is painted in Henry Ford’s favorite car color — black. And it just happens to be one of my favorites from the Thirties — love the grille, and the headlight shape was pretty unique. Jim Corbran, RRofWNY …and check out our Facebook page: Non-American Classic Cars The post

RealRides Of WNY

Second-generation T-Birds were popularly known (for obvious reasons) as Square-Birds. This 1962 Ford Thunderbird is of the third-generation, often referred to as Bullet-Noses, again, for obvious reasons. This (rather grainy… no, let’s call it “artistic-looking”) photo was taken over the summer in Tonawanda, of an example which sports a set of one of my all-time favorite wheel covers. Yes, I have a

RealRides Of WNY

Seems like there are still gazillions of Buick Century and Olds Cutlass Ciera wagons on the road, but it’s not every day you see a 1989 Pontiac 6000 Safari like this one. Probably due to the fact that so few were built (just 8,677 for ’89), which I could never really figure out, as the Buick and Olds versions were pricier. Whatever. Saw this a short time ago in Niagara Falls. Jim Corbran, RRofWNY

RealRides Of WNY

Here’s something you don’t see every day — a 1961 Ford Falcon Fordor station wagon. Yes, a Fordor, as in four-doors, I guess. And before you ask, the two-door version was called a Tudor. I’d love to have been in the meeting where they picked those names. Must have been after a three-martini lunch. Saw this one over the summer in North Tonawnda. Jim Corbran, RRofWNY …and check out our Facebook page

RealRides Of WNY

This 1976 Lincoln Continental is from Ford’s “Go Big or Stay Home” school of design. There was also a two-door version of this barge, whose doors were the size of Rhode Island and gave its drivers Popeye-sized left arms. The passengers of course, had Popeye-sized right arms. Found this one a while back in North Tonawanda. Jim Corbran, RRofWNY …and check out our Facebook page: Non-American Classic

RealRides Of WNY

I’m still trying to decide if this 1993 Ford Probe is green or blue. I’ve always kind of liked the shape of these early Probes before they got all swoopy with a lot of tacked-on plastic body effects. If you look real hard you can probably still find this one parked in a Niagara Falls lot. Jim Corbran, RRofWNY …and check out our Facebook page: Non-American Classic Cars The post RealRides Of WNY app

RealRides Of WNY

This 1960 Ford Thunderbird, seen just last week in Youngstown, represents the third and final year of the ‘Bird’s first foray into the back seat business. Purists were up in arms when the two-passenger version grew a back seat for MY 1958, but the numbers proved that Ford knew what they were doing. Sales of the ’58 were more than 50 percent higher than the previous year. Purists be damned! Jim Cor

RealRides Of WNY

Not every ride is a car or truck. Like fr’instance, this mid-20th century Ferguson TO-20 tractor, seen along the roadside in Wheatfield over the summer. See, all old tractors aren’t red, or green & yellow — this one came painted gray right from the factory; and it still looks ready for work! Jim Corbran, RRofWNY …and check out our Facebook page: Non-American Classic Cars The post RealRides Of

RealRides of WNY

I’ve always admired the front-end of the 1970 Pontiac GTO. I’ve also often wondered why Pontiac didn’t give a similar treatment to the rear end, as it would have made for a much more cohesive look. And how did those hood-mounted tachometers work out in the middle of a WNY winter? I imagine there were days where you couldn’t read them at all. Came across this one over the summer in Hamburg. Jim Cor