Realrides Of WNY

RealRides of WNY

It’s fun coming across cars like this 1963 Oldsmobile Super 88 sedan, seen parked in front of a repair garage in Tonawanda a couple of weeks ago (we saw this same car in a North Tonawanda driveway years ago). These are the cars that inhabited neighbors’ driveways when we were kids, but not many of them exist anymore. The GTOs, the 4-4-2s… you saw far fewer of them back in the day but they are the

RealRides of WNY

You do tend to notice more of your surroundings while riding a bicycle, which is how I noticed this 1970 Chrysler 300 sitting off to the side in a parking lot near Buff State. The letter-series 300 was originally Chrysler’s hot rod when it debuted in 1955, but as you can see, by 1970 this non-lettered four-door vinyl-roofed hardtop with whitewalls looked very un-hot roddish. Nevertheless, Chrysler

RealRides of WNY

This very patriotic-looking 1964 Chevrolet Impala Super Sport was seen on one of my summer bicycle treks through Buffalo’s near-West Side. A bunch of guys hanging out in the street (which is what guys do in the middle of a hot summer Sunday in the city) told me the owner plans on fixing it up. It looks like there are still a few more pieces needed to complete this puzzle, but my hopes are high. Ji

RealRides of WNY

This just goes to show you that yes, everything does look better with Baby Moons and whitewalls! Even this 1980 Cadillac Coupe deVille, which we saw last weekend parked up in Youngstown. The popular (decades ago) hubcaps were named after Dean Moon, founder of the west coast’s legendary MOON Speed Equipment company, and originator of the aerodynamic full Moon Disc wheel covers. In case you are wond

RealRides of WNY

I was wishing I could have followed this 1987-89 Buick LeSabre T-Type coupe and gotten a better photo, but sometimes you just have to be someplace else — in five minutes! One of GM’s last full-sized two-door sedan/coupes, the LeSabre shared a body with the Olds Delta 88 (one of which we also photographed just two days later). The T-Type option package was pretty much sold across the Buick line, fr

RealRides of WNY

A rather rare 1959 Ford Ranchero, seen a while back in Niagara Falls. This was the third year for Ford’s car/truck, and the final year it would be built on the full-sized Ford’s platform. Starting with the 1960 models, the Ranchero became part of the compact Falcon line; then in 1966 it switched again for the last time to the midsized line, named at one time or another: Fairlane, Torino, and final

RealRides of WNY

When I saw this 1962 Dodge over the summer in Tonawanda, I thought it was just another 1962 Dodge. But looking into it, it seems to be a bit more of a rare car. The Hurst badge on the trunklid should have been a clue. The wheels and (some of) the trim would make this out to be one of Dodge’s hot-rod 413 wedge cars. All of the references to the 413 I can find list it as a Polara, but some of this c

RealRides of WNY

Here’s one of those cars it’s almost impossible to tell the model year of — a Mercury Zephyr station wagon which looked pretty much the same from 1978-81. It was a clone of Ford’s Fairmont with a miniscule amount of different trim bits thrown on. This is from Ford’s boxy styling era where just about every car was really squared-off. Anyone heard uttering the word “aerodynamics” in Ford’s styling s

RealRides of WNY

Thanks to my daughter Katie, who photographed this Jaguar MK 2 3.8 as we walked the streets of New York City (I think we may have been in Brooklyn — it’s all a haze right now) a couple of weekends ago (I also took a pic with my not-so-smartphone, but we’ll leave that one in the files). The 3.8-litre version was produced in the MK 2’s final two years of 1966-67; this one looks pretty darned good fo

RealRides of WNY

This 1954 Ford Customline Ranch Wagon in Sea Haze Green looks like it just left the new car showroom. Well, on the outside, anyway. The interior is in the midst of a restoration which I’ll bet will match the high standard set by the parts we can see from the road. In Ford’s station wagon nomenclature, Ranch Wagons were two-doors and Country Sedans were four-doors; Country Squires of course, wore e