Realrides Of WNY

Real Rides of WNY

This 1964 Mercury Monterey four-door sedan features Mercury’s Breezeway design— the reverse-slanted rear window slides down behind the rear seat for added ventilation. Other than the styling quirkiness of the Breezeway, I’m not sure why this nifty feature never caught on. The chrome fender skirts are also a nice J.C. Whitney blast-from-the-past touch. Saw this one recently just outside of Pendleto

RealRides of WNY

This 1990 Volkswagen Corrado G60 is one fast car, with a supercharged engine driving the front wheels. The Corrado was VW’s replacement for the sporty Scirocco (although for a couple a years they were both being made and sold). In production for eight years, the Corrado is hailed as a driver’s car, and was named by the British magazine Car as one of the “25 Cars You Must Drive Before You Die.” I s

RealRides of WNY

This picture is so old, it’s a scan from an actual photograph taken at a car show in Lockport at the Niagara County Fairgrounds back in 1997. The Liberty plates on this 1963-1/2 Falcon Sprint were current at the time the picture was taken! This was the sporty Falcon, the first hardtop in the line, introduced halfway through the model year with bucket seats, a V-8, etc., and was basically a preview

RealRides of WNY

You had to hand it to Chrysler chairman Lee Iacocca back in the nineties; he made silk purses out of sows ears and successfully put lipstick on pigs. So to speak. This 1991 Imperial was, under the skin, born of the humble K-Car, just one of many iterations of the cheap compact which Iacocca’s designers and engineers squeezed out of that little sedan. Purists may have groaned when they first slappe

RealRides of WNY

In the brochure they told us this 1965 Buick Skylark was the car for “…people who demand the luxury of a big car in a slightly smaller size.” If you remember, the Skylark was originally an upscale model in the compact Buick Special line. By 1964 they were no longer compacts, and by the time this 1965 model rolled around they actually looked like mini full-sized Buicks. Very handsome was this one,

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RealRides of WNY

One more from the recent car show at The Buffalo History Museum — a 1966 International Scout. Manufactured by the International-Harvester Corp., the Scout was an alternative to the Jeep (and eventually, a bevy of other competitors) and was available in hardtop, convertible, and pickup versions. As I snapped these photos, this red convertible was being drooled over by a Dad who seemed to be trying

RealRides of WNY

If nothing else, RRofWNY is an equal opportunity blog, which is why today we’re featuring this rather ordinary (but probably rare, these days) 1992 Chevrolet Cavalier wagon. Our sources tell us that almost 20,000 of these left the factory, but how often to you see one anymore? It’s too bad that the American automobile industry has pretty much given up on the compact station wagon in favor of cross

RealRides of WNY

This 1959 Ford Galaxie was the top-of-the-line model in the Fairlane 500 series. You can tell a Galaxie from a regular old Fairlane 500 by its squared-off, Thunderbird-inspired roofline — well, except for the convertible of course. A name change to Galaxie 500 occurred for model year 1962, when the Fairlane name was given to Ford’s new mid-sized car, the Galaxie moved down a notch, and the Galaxie

RealRides of WNY

From this past weekend’s car show at The Buffalo History Museum, one of the rarest things you’ll see on the streets of WNY — a 1948 Playboy. Made in the Buffalo area for 1948-49 by the Playboy Motor Car Corp., only 97 left the factory in Tonawanda before financial troubles ended the dream of company founder Lou Horwitz. The convertible featured one of (if not the) first retractable hardtops, and m